Body & Soul August 2014 Newsletter

gym jargon explained

As with all industries, the health and fitness industry has its own jargon. While our trainers try their best to explain exercises and concepts using layman's terms, you may hear some unfamiliar terms during your workout. Following are some of the more common gym jargon terms:

  • Concentric: part of a lift where the muscle shortens under tension (example: as you raise the weight during a bicep curl).
  • Eccentric: part of a lift where the muscle lengthens under tension (example: as you lower the weight during a bicep curl).
  • Hypertrophy: as your muscles are overloaded during training, they will increase in size and strength (hypertrophy). Atrophy (muscles decreasing in size) occurs when training ceases.
  • Target heart rate: a heart rate at which your health provider has identified that you are getting the most benefits out of your workout.
  • One-rep max: the heaviest weight you can push or pull for one repetition of an exercise. During your health assessment we measured your 10-rep max.
  • Overtraining: caused by excessively challenging your mind and body with physical activity beyond its normal capabilities, without providing it with adequate rest to recover.

Many of Body & Soul’s Personal Trainers have a bachelor’s degree in health and fitness related fields and will jump at the chance to show what they know. If your trainer uses a term that you are not familiar with, ask them to explain it to you. Whether it is explaining the proper form and technique of a particular exercise or explaining the science behind muscle regeneration, your trainer will be more than happy to help you understand.

fitness tip: balancing opposing muscle groups

As an RMT, I see a lot of patients with “upper and lower cross syndromes” which means that one side of the body is more developed than the other. To avoid such imbalances you should consider exercises that involve extension and external rotation movement of the shoulder, hip joints and spine. Opposing muscle groups must be in balance — equally toned, equally stretched. In cases of an imbalance, the stronger muscle groups will overpower the weaker ones which can lead to many different kinds of problems, including respiratory system issues, poor posture, headaches, and pain in the shoulders, neck and back. So, when you go to the gym do an odd “bridge exercise” that will work as a nice counter to all the flexion and internal rotation exercises, such as bench presses, pull downs and sit-ups.

Dainis Viskers is a Registered Massage Therapist at Body & Soul

nutrition tip: how important is a well balanced breakfast?

For many of us, eating breakfast can be a tedious task in the morning — particularly if it involves any sort of preparation. In fact, according to the University of Alberta Health Centre, only 12% of Canadians eat a well balanced breakfast. So how important is your breakfast? Studies continue to show that breakfast may be the most important meal of the day. Not only will eating a well balanced breakfast help fuel your body for a good start to your day but it can help reduce your risk of chronic diseases, boost your brain power and help you achieve and maintain a healthy body weight. For more information, check out this article by the University of Alberta Health Centre.

club news

Studio Cleaning / Labour Day: It's that time again! The studio will be closed Thursday August 28th until Monday September 1st for our annual extensive cleaning. Studio will re-open Tuesday September 2nd at 6am.

Summer Special: Body & Soul’s Summer Special is now available. Purchase ten 1-on-1 sessions for $650, ten Partner sessions for $975 or four weeks of Small Group Training (one session a week) for $90. Offer ends August 9th. Conditions apply. Speak with our front desk for more information.

New Staff Member: Body & Soul is pleased to officially welcome Stephen Paget to the Personal Training Team! Stephen came highly recommended by fellow Personal Trainer, Patrick Minassian.

Save the Date!: Body & Soul’s annual Open House will be held Saturday September 20th. Join us for complimentary snacks, a personal training special, fitness stations, lots of small prizes, a grand prize of 10 Personal Training sessions and more!

Dainis Viskers

Registered Massage Therapist

Dainis graduated from the West Coast College of Massage Therapy in 2013. He also has a Bachelor's degree in Sport Science and Sports Education obtained in his native Latvia. He has an extensive background in martial arts, having competed in high level competitions and run a martial arts club. Dainis was previously a member of the UBC Track and Field massage therapy team and has extensive experience treating sports injuries. Read more...

 

trainer's corner

Q: I want to lift heavier — why do so few reps with so much rest in between sets?

A: The whole idea behind training for muscular strength is to be able to lift heavy loads with proper movement mechanics. In this training phase, your long-term goal is to lift incrementally heavier within given amounts of time so that you can eventually reach your preferred one-rep max. In order to do this with proper technique, your muscles must be fresh and fully recovered so that they can all fire at maximum potential during time under tension. Thus, a rep range of 2-6 is recommended so that you do not lift heavy weight under fatigue. Also, a rest period of 3-4 minutes is recommended between sets to allow for sufficient muscle and nervous system recovery.

Brandon Santo is a Personal Trainer at Body & Soul

 

contest

Check out our September issue for the next newsletter contest.