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Fitness File – December Issue

fitness files

The December issue of our monthly e-newsletter – The Fitness File – came out this week! This issue covers the following:

  • “life begins at the end of your comfort zone.” – Neale Donald Walsch
  • looking for a holiday gift?
  • fitness tip: eccentric training
  • nutrition tip: baking with avocados
  • club news: studio closure, holiday charity , home program and new staff member
  • staff spotlight: Michelle Wong (Head Trainer)
  • Q&A: do I apply heat or ice after sustaining an injury?

Check it out here.

New to training?

Starting a fitness program is an exciting journey but it can prove challenging with so many people wanting to jump in right away without fully understanding their current fitness level, strengths and limitations. Without properly identifying what you need from your fitness program or how much your body can physically handle, you greatly increase your chance of injury. While this may not concern you, consider how an injury can further delay your progress in achieving your goals – not to mention other costs (financial, physical and emotional) associated with recovery.

It’s important when starting a new program (or starting from scratch) that you speak with a fitness professional to better understand what it is that you need to help you achieve your goals.

What is periodization?

Periodization involves planned variation in the volume and intensity of training; for instance, dividing a training program into cycles or phases. Ensuring variation in volume and intensity of training is important for optimal strength gain. Hans Selye’s General Adaptations Syndrome describes three phases of adaptation, shock adaptation and staleness (also known as alarm, resistance and exhaustion).

Shock occurs after initiation of novel stimulus in which case your body suffers from soreness and decreased performance. Adaptation occurs during repeated training exposure leading to increased performance. When your body has fully adapted to the new program, you reach the staleness phase, a time when the same stimulus no longer produces further adaptation; as a result, performance may plateau. To ensure further increase in performance, rest or a change in stimulus may be required.

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